Sustainability http://www.timesaerospace.aero/ en Wed, 17 Jul 2024 10:15:48 +0100 INJAZ Al-Arab and Boeing launch sustainable aviation course in Middle East http://www.timesaerospace.aero/news/sustainability/injaz-al-arab-and-boeing-launch-sustainable-aviation-course-in-middle-east

The course is available on the INJAZ Campus digital education platform and aims to equip 4,000 high school and university students in Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Kuwait, Morocco, and Oman with the relevant knowledge and skills to drive sustainability in the aviation industry.

 

Kuljit Ghata-Aura, president of Boeing Middle East, Türkiye, Africa, and Central Asia, said: “Achieving commercial aviation’s net zero target by 2050 requires involving the next generation. Boeing is partnering with non-profits and academia to educate and inspire young talent who will eventually design, build, and operate zero-emissions aircraft or develop new pathways for sustainable aviation fuels (SAF)”.

 

By fostering a better understanding of corporate social responsibility, sustainable operations, renewable energy transition including SAF, and more, the course will inspire students to pursue rewarding careers in aviation and sustainability.

 

Akef Aqrabawi, president and CEO of INJAZ Al-Arab, said: "We are thrilled to introduce our first-ever sustainable aviation course, marking a significant milestone in our longstanding partnership with Boeing. INJAZ has always been dedicated to empowering young people to make positive changes in their lives and communities. With environmental concerns ranking among the world's top priorities today, we believe this course will serve as a gateway to building a professional sustainability-driven community."

The course is available both offline and online, offering flexibility to meet the specific needs of each participating country. It welcomes students registered within academic institutions in Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Kuwait, Morocco, and Oman.

The curriculum comprises six comprehensive one-hour modules, covering various topics related to sustainability in aviation. Participants will engage in real-world case studies, gaining practical insights into the delicate balance between decarbonising aviation and preserving and growing the societal and economic benefits of it.

For over 15 years, INJAZ Al-Arab and Boeing have been working closely to upskill and empower the youth in the Middle East and North Africa.

Posted date
First paragraph

INJAZ Al-Arab, a member of Junior Achievement (JA) Worldwide, has joined forces with Boeing to launch a course on aviation sustainability.

Regions
Other topics
Rate
No votes yet
Top story
On
Article main topic
Redirected
Off
Moved to features
Off
Lead image:
New batch
Off
Wed, 17 Jul 2024 09:15:48 +0000 eNethersole 68669 at http://www.timesaerospace.aero
Oman Air reinforces sustainability goals with eco-friendly earphone packaging http://www.timesaerospace.aero/news/sustainability/oman-air-reinforces-sustainability-goals-with-eco-friendly-earphone-packaging

Working with Linstol, a global eco-friendly in-flight products provider, the airline anticipates the change will enable it to eliminate 6.48 tonnes of non-recyclable waste material each year, an amount which equates to saving an estimated 110 trees from deforestation or conserving 207,360 litres of water.

“We are delighted to introduce this latest initiative on board, which represents our ongoing commitment to our planet by reducing the environmental impact of air travel, while ensuring our guests enjoy a comfortable and convenient experience that aligns with their values,” said Con Korfiatis, chief executive officer. “We believe that small changes make a big impact and we continue to look for innovative solutions in all corners of our operations, while promoting and advocating for initiatives that support both the UN Sustainable Development Goals and Oman’s national objectives.”

Posted date
First paragraph

Oman Air has redesigned the packaging for its Economy Class earphones, replacing single-use plastic PET foil with a recyclable Kraft paper envelope.

Regions
Other topics
Rate
No votes yet
Top story
Off
Article main topic
Redirected
Off
Moved to features
Off
Lead image:
New batch
Off
Wed, 10 Jul 2024 13:46:27 +0000 eNethersole 68646 at http://www.timesaerospace.aero
IATA and ASF to develop standard cabin waste composition audit programme http://www.timesaerospace.aero/news/sustainability/iata-and-asf-to-develop-standard-cabin-waste-composition-audit-programme

CWCA audits have already been trialled in two waves, covering 25 flights (short, medium, and long-haul) at Singapore’s Changi Airport in November 2023 and April 2024. ASF conducted the audits based on a methodology developed by IATA. Preliminary results indicate that the sector is generating over 3.6 million metric tonnes of cabin and catering waste annually, with 65% being food and beverage waste. Untouched meals account for 18% of all waste.

Audit data will guide the airline industry and policy makers in their efforts to reduce the levels of waste produced and improve circularity by identifying opportunities for re-use and re-cycling. Previous IATA research identified the lack of a standardised methodology with respect to conducting cabin waste audits and, as a result, harmonised data is not available to underpin decision-making by policymakers, airlines, and caterers regarding waste-related issues. A standardised audit will help solve these issues and enable the sector to demonstrate progress towards waste reduction and improved circularity.

“Managing and reducing waste is an important component of aviation’s overall sustainability. Obtaining standardised and comparable data regarding the composition and quantity of waste from flights will help the industry to reduce the waste it generates. Better data will also help policymakers to harmonise regulations, which in turn can help optimise the industry’s capability to sort, re-cycle and safely re-use waste that cannot be avoided. Working with ASF in developing this audit program is a significant step forward in improving the circularity of the sector,” said Marie Owens Thomsen, IATA’s senior vice president sustainability and chief economist.

“The ASF’s mission is to help the aviation sector reduce the levels of cabin waste generated and achieve higher levels of waste recovery and circularity. Working with IATA to develop a cabin waste composition auditing standard for the sector is a significant step forward. Effectively managing cabin waste is a challenge that can be solved with the backing of data. It is the responsibility of the sector and its regulators to come together, understand the problem and align on the needed solutions,” said Matt Crane, ASF’s Founder.

Posted date
First paragraph

IATA is collaborating with the Aviation Sustainability Forum (ASF) to launch a standardised Cabin Waste Composition Audit (CWCA) platform to be launched in September 2024.

Regions
Rate
No votes yet
Top story
Off
Article main topic
Redirected
Off
Moved to features
Off
Lead image:
New batch
Off
Thu, 04 Jul 2024 09:32:58 +0000 eNethersole 68624 at http://www.timesaerospace.aero
South Africa has vast potential in Sustainable Aviation Fuel production http://www.timesaerospace.aero/news/sustainability/south-africa-has-vast-potential-in-sustainable-aviation-fuel-production

The call came as government and industry officials gathered in Johannesburg for the IATA Wings of Change Focus Africa conference.

“South Africa has vast potential to become a leading Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) producer in the region. And there is a waiting market for SAF as airlines work to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050. More than a strategy in support of aviation’s decarbonisation, it is a strategy for economic development and should be a top priority for the new South African government. Across agriculture, energy, and transportation, new jobs and industries are waiting to be created that would not only help fight poverty but also contribute to greater energy independence,” said Marie Owens Thomsen, IATA’s senior vice president for sustainability and chief economist.

South Africa chaired the 2022 ICAO Assembly at which governments agreed to a long-term goal aligned with the aviation industry’s net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 commitment. The role of SAF in achieving this goal was emphasised by the ICAO CAAF/3 objective of a 5% average global reduction in aviation’s carbon emissions by 2030. As decarbonising aviation will require global collaboration, it is critical that global or regional stakeholders like States, development banks, industry, academia and other relevant parties bring forces together to help countries with SAF potential to develop their industry.

“Airlines are ready and waiting to purchase SAF as evidenced by the fact that every drop of SAF produced has been purchased and used. But the production volumes are a minute fraction of what aviation needs. That’s why it is essential for governments of countries with production potential, such as South Africa, to embrace what is a unique win-win-win opportunity for economic development, energy transition, and decarbonised air transportation,” said Thomsen.

IATA highlighted several advantages for South Africa in developing SAF production, which have also been noted by a study undertaken by World Wildlife Fund (WWF):

·         Feedstock Potential: South Africa has an abundance of feedstocks from which SAF can be derived including sugarcane low carbon by-products, and biomass from cleared invasive alien plants (IAPs). With respect to IAPs, harvesting them will come with other environmental benefits such as improved biodiversity and water security. In all cases, no feedstocks would compete with food production for land or water use in line with the ICAO sustainability framework.

·         Significant Production Capacity: The WWF estimates that South Africa has the potential to produce between 3.2 and 4.5 billion litres of SAF annually. This will be more than meet domestic  fuel demand (1.8 billion litres) and present an export opportunity, where policies will be central for realisation. Achieving production at the higher range of potential would require the co-development of a green hydrogen capability.

·         Existing Refinery Infrastructure: South Africa has existing refinery infrastructure which should be explored for brownfield investments—plant conversions or co-processing.

·         Experience: South Africa has long experience in synthetic fuel production, particularly the Fischer-Tropsch method. Moreover, the country’s robust academic and research institutions also have a history of supporting innovations and technology for fuel production. It’s the time we see polices to enable their role in SAF deployment.

·         Strategic Geographic Location: South Africa’s airports, particularly OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg and Cape Town International Airport, serve as important hubs for connecting flights within Africa and to other parts of the world.

To capitalise on South Africa’s SAF potential, IATA urges the government to adopt a strategic plan that should include four critical areas:

1.    Industrial Infrastructure: Accelerate the development of production capabilities by using existing industrial infrastructure (brownfield investment) as a competitive advantage in the development and scaling of SAF production.

2.    Pooling Resources: Identify opportunities to develop SAF by encouraging collaboration between the government, private sector, and international partners to pool resources and expertise.

3.    Incentives for Research and Development (R&D): Spur innovation to drive down costs, increase production volumes, and diversify source crops/production methodologies with tax incentives, grants, and subsidies for R&D in SAF technologies.

4.    Investment in Infrastructure: Support the development of necessary infrastructure (greenfield), such as biorefineries and green hydrogen production facilities with tax and other incentives.

Posted date
First paragraph

IATA has called on South Africa to mobilise its experience, resources, and infrastructure to accelerate the development of SAF.

Regions
Rate
No votes yet
Top story
On
Article main topic
Redirected
Off
Moved to features
Off
Lead image:
New batch
Off
Thu, 04 Jul 2024 09:01:59 +0000 eNethersole 68623 at http://www.timesaerospace.aero
India seeks balance on aviation growth and paying the sustainability price http://www.timesaerospace.aero/news/sustainability/india-seeks-balance-on-aviation-growth-and-paying-the-sustainability-price

How does the market grow at the pace its citizens and government desire, while footing the bill for the carbon emissions this will take?

“There is a challenge to balance the growth along with the climate,” Ekta Agrawal, deputy director, directorate general of Civil Aviation India, told delegates.

And the big question for India is how much and when it should pay for emitting carbon as a developing nation whose air transport industry is far from mature and has players like Air India, IndiGo and Akasa Air, among others, that are making significant strides on domestic and international growth with the intention of becoming fully relevant global players.

So, what is the progress India is making on the aviation sustainability front?

Firstly, as Agrawal explained, India is participating in ICAO’s Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA) in the mandatory phase in relation to the emissions generated by its international carriers. The country is in the reporting and verification phase at present with carriers likely to begin paying for their emissions from 2027 onwards.

This payment can be made in two ways. “You can purchase carbon emission units to offset the market [impact]. This is like carbon trading, or you can use sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) to reduce your emissions,” said Agrawal.

In a side-note India is looking at establishing a carbon trading market, with an important question for aviation being whether it is included in such a scheme.

With CORSIA down to handle international emissions, of greater import is the growth of India’s domestic air transport emissions, which will rise exponentially as the hundreds of aircraft ordered by its airlines enter service.

However, with zero SAF production in India today and no desire to hold back the aviation sector, the country is seeking to strike a balance between achieving emissions targets and airline growth.

At present, India’s approach to national emissions control is not sector specific, ie not targeting aviation specifically. However, it will target its growing emissions through the instrument of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), said Agrawal. These are the national climate pledges that articulate how a country will contribute to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and adapt to climate impacts.

However, India has launched “indicative targets” for SAF, she explained. These see a 1% SAF blend for international flights only from 2027, 2% in 2028 and 5% in 2030. For now, these targets will not apply to domestic flights.

“These targets are not binding. They are to provide a positive signal to the market to bring in investors so [SAF] production starts and will allow India as a country to see how this is rolling out,” said Agrawal.

Some countries, such as the European Union and the UK, have brought in mandates to encourage SAF usage. “Mandates is not the right approach for India right now,” she said.

Tuhin Sen, assistant director, external affairs India, IATA summarised the current state of play in the SAF production landscape in India detailing the pathways, the declared production quanta and indicative project completion timelines. IATA has noted four SAF production projects in the works in India today.

Sen emphasised the importance of availability of SAF in the Indian market. He noted that mandates, if any, must be complemented with incentives to accelerate the production of SAF in the country.

He added that there is a strong alignment of the DGCA and IATA’s stance on SAF in India. Since India does not yet produce a single drop of SAF, the DGCA’s position on “indicative blending targets is a nuanced and a progressive one.”

“Amongst all the options to decarbonise the aviation sector, SAF contributes to around 65-70%, thus, to stimulate the development of SAF production, policy interventions are required either by providing Viability Gap Finance (VGF) for setting up plants or India should introduce an incentive policy [such as the USA has done, providing tax credit incentives], in addition to its indicative blended targets,” said Vineet Bakshi, director business development India, LanzaTech.

Bakshi added: “This policy mix will deliver both a push and a pull in terms of encouraging SAF off takers and investor interest, he explained. Success of renewable power and ethanol blending is testament of such support from the government in the past.”

LanzaTech’s subsidiary, LanzaJet, is exploring the development of SAF production in India following the signing of an MOU with Indian Oil Corporation Ltd in February 2023.

Bakshi said that the combined offering of LanzaTech-LanzaJet has the capability of taking any kind of waste stream and recycled carbon and turning it into SAF. “We firmly believe, in future, SAF through local waste feedstock will be a local solution for decarbonising the aviation sector.

On the airline front, Air India Express, the low-cost arm of Air India, is taking a lead on sustainability with various initiatives, including several “green flights” designed to optimise all aspects of a flight to improve operational efficiency and reduce fuel consumption. explained Captain Pranav Sood, Chief Pilot Technical, Air India Express.

With CORSIA implementation on the horizon, Sood has begun talking to the airline’s finance team to bring them up to date on the cost implications. “I am saying to them we must begin factoring it into our financial planning,” he noted, with a need to model the cost of carbon offsets [and/or the purchase of SAF] later this decade.

“With Air India Express growing at pace, it must be aware of the implications of its growth. The carrier is inducting Boeing 737 Max aircraft into its fleet at a rate of three per month on average over the coming year,” said Sood.

Although it is monitoring SAF projects, such as that being pursued by LanzaJet, today Air India Express is focusing on a raft of operational measures to improve efficiency.

Its first Green Flight was on 19 April this year between capital Delhi and Ranchi in the north-east of the country, some 800 miles. “We optimised every aspect of this flight working with airports, ATC and handlers,” said Sood.

The result was a 53% fuel burn saving compared to a normal flight demonstrating what can be achieved if all stakeholders work together.

The Air India team took this to another level on 5 June with seven Green Flights taking place across the group’s fleet, including widebody aircraft, and 31 different initiatives all aimed at improving efficiency.

“What the efforts showed is that enhancing existing operational procedures can make an impact. “We don’t need to wait for SAF, we don’t need to wait for anyone right now, it’s just the co-ordination of the ecosystem,” said Sood.

“He does not underestimate the challenge, acknowledging that it took a major effort to undertake these Green Flights and get all the different parties on board. And there was still an opportunity for more [efficiencies],” he added.

More Green Flights are on the cards. “We will do it as much as possible but getting the data is the start with the aim of getting everyone to the table, show the numbers and then talk to all stakeholders in the ecosystem,” Sood said.

Concluding the panel, Ekta Agrawal of the DGCA said: “I believe India is already a leader [on sustainability] by making very responsible choices. And I think the most important thing which needs to change is the attitude of the people towards the environment.

“How many people are going to purchase tickets based on I'm saving more fuel or more I'm emitting less than another airline? No, they go for the price, so the attitude of people that needs to change,” she stated.

Posted date
First paragraph

A clear takeaway from the sustainability panel at the inaugural Aviation India Summit 2024 in mid-June is that one of the fastest growing air transport markets in the world right now has a dilemma.

Regions
Other topics
Author
Rate
No votes yet
Top story
Off
Article main topic
Redirected
Off
Moved to features
Off
Lead image:
New batch
Off
Mon, 01 Jul 2024 13:23:48 +0000 eNethersole 68606 at http://www.timesaerospace.aero
Flydubai receives “Outstanding Sector Leadership and Growth” award http://www.timesaerospace.aero/news/events/flydubai-receives-outstanding-sector-leadership-and-growth-award

Voted by industry experts, the award honours the carrier’s strong and agile business model and its dedication to innovation and enhancing connectivity to new and previously underserved markets which has enabled its sustained growth.

Francois Oberholzer, chief financial officer at flydubai, picked up the award and said: “We are pleased to have received this award as it recognises our efforts and longstanding commitment to offering an enhanced and convenient travel experience for our customers. Since 2009, we have seen our fleet and network grow alongside the innovation of our products and services and as we continue to support Dubai’s position as an international aviation hub, we look forward to connecting more passengers from the UAE and around the flydubai network.”

Posted date
First paragraph

Flydubai has received the “Outstanding Sector Leadership and Growth” award at the MEA Business Achievement Awards.

Regions
Other topics
Rate
No votes yet
Top story
On
Article main topic
Redirected
Off
Moved to features
Off
Lead image:
New batch
Off
Fri, 28 Jun 2024 08:12:09 +0000 eNethersole 68595 at http://www.timesaerospace.aero
Turkish Airlines wins "Most Sustainable Flag Carrier Airline" award http://www.timesaerospace.aero/news/sustainability/turkish-airlines-wins-most-sustainable-flag-carrier-airline-award

Turkish Airlines Chairman of the Board and Executive Committee, Prof. Ahmet Bolat, said: “Receiving the Most Sustainable Flag Carrier Airline award for the third-year running is a testament to our dedication to sustainability and environmental stewardship. Turkish Airlines has set a strategic goal to become one of the world's top 3 airlines in terms of digitalisation. In line with our commitment to becoming a Carbon-Neutral Airline by 2050, we incorporated the use of Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) into our climate change mitigation plans in 2022, and we further expanded our use of SAF to new routes in 2023. We will continue to add new routes to our SAF-powered network and pursue our commitment to sustainable practices throughout our operations.”

Posted date
First paragraph

Turkish Airlines has been honoured with the “Most Sustainable Flag Carrier Airline” award by World Finance.

Regions
Other topics
Rate
No votes yet
Top story
On
Article main topic
Redirected
Off
Moved to features
Off
Lead image:
New batch
Off
Thu, 27 Jun 2024 09:00:36 +0000 eNethersole 68590 at http://www.timesaerospace.aero
How Emirates pilots reduce fuel and emissions during operations http://www.timesaerospace.aero/news/sustainability/how-emirates-pilots-reduce-fuel-and-emissions-during-operations

Flying smarter and maintaining a strong focus on minimising fuel consumption and emissions starts in the cockpit. Emirates embarked on implementing “Green Operating Procedures” (‘Green Ops’)  in 2016, taking a multi-pronged approach that looks for opportunities to reduce on-ground and in-flight fuel use, in addition to providing pilots with the necessary education, awareness, data analytics and technology to help them manage their flights as efficiently as possible.

Led by an internal cross-functional Operations Efficiency Steering Group, the airline aims to mitigate unnecessary fuel burn and emissions wherever possible, while ensuring the highest safety standards embraced by Emirates are never compromised. In the last financial year 2023-2024, ‘Green Ops’ and other operating initiatives helped Emirates reduce fuel burn by more than 48,000 tonnes and carbon emissions by over 151,000 tonnes.

Captain Hassan Al Hammadi, Emirates’ Divisional Senior Vice President Flight Operations said: “We’re proud of the work done across the Flight Operations team, and the contributions of our pilots in significantly reducing fuel consumption and emissions. This could have only happened through collective discipline, commitment, and dedication to sustainable aviation practices in the cockpit, all while maintaining the highest levels of safety. We’ve equipped our pilot community with the latest tools and applications to monitor and review their flight performance, helping them to improve their awareness of how their flying techniques impact fuel consumption and emissions. We’ll continue to invest in cutting-edge technologies and accelerate solutions that yield long-term environmental benefits.”

Here are some of the key operational measures taken in the air and on the ground wherever operationally feasible during each Emirates flight to reduce unnecessary fuel burn and emissions:

Discretionary Extra Fuel

The Commander of the flight bears the ultimate responsibility for ensuring that each flight uplifts a sufficient quantity of fuel for safe operations. Depending on the assessment of prevailing operational circumstances, the Captain may choose to uplift extra fuel beyond the minimum stipulated by regulatory standards. This initiative aims to encourage the Captain to uplift extra fuel based on well-founded judgment and legitimate operational needs. The goal is to furnish Captains with pertinent data and analysis, aiding them in making more informed and precise decisions regarding the uplift of extra fuel. With this initiative uplift of discretionary extra fuel has reduced significantly.

Flight speed optimisation

An aircraft’s speed directly impacts its fuel consumption and emissions. To accurately calculate the optimised speed for a flight, a number of considerations are made based on a thorough calculation that seeks to minimise total operating costs while maintaining adherence to departure and arrival schedules. Depending on prevailing operating conditions, pilots may have the opportunity to adjust speed to decrease fuel consumption without compromising the integrity of the flight schedule. This inflight speed management is an integral part of all Emirates’ pilot SOPs.

Reduced flap landing

Aircraft have the flexibility to land using a variety of flap configurations. Emirates pilots carefully assess and select the flap setting that minimises aerodynamic drag, reducing fuel consumption as a result. This decision is made without compromising safety and is adapted to different runway conditions.

Idle reverse thrust

As soon as the aircraft is on the ground, pilots have the option to use different levels of reverse thrust, providing backwards thrust to decelerate the aircraft. Based on prevailing conditions and runway length, Emirates pilots will prioritise the use of idle reverse thrust to reduce fuel consumption. 

Reduced engine taxi-in (RETI)

During ground taxiing after landing, aircraft don't require power from all engines. Emirates pilots take advantage of every opportunity to engage in reduced engine taxiing by shutting down one or two engines (depending on the aircraft's engine configuration) upon landing. This practice is implemented without compromising safety or operational efficiency. Since it was introduced, the use of RETI has increased by almost seven fold.

Optimised flight routings

A pioneer and early adopter of flight planning efficiencies, Emirates has been using flexible flight routes since 2003. Working directly with air traffic control and other industry bodies across its network, the airline works hard to optimise each route flown between cities. Optimising routings enables Emirates to carry and use less fuel on flights, resulting in lower emissions. It also means time saved for customers.

Technology and Innovation - Flight Pulse

Emirates introduced FlightPulse (collaboratively developed with GE Digital Aviation Services), an extensive self-service data analytics tool to all its pilots, incorporating crucial elements of operational data and analytics pertaining to the safety and fuel efficiency performance of each flight. This tool has significantly transformed the monitoring of flight operations data.  The rollout of FlightPulse has fostered improved collaboration between Flight Operations management and the pilot community at Emirates, ultimately enhancing safety and efficiency of flights. This initiative demonstrates the airline’s commitment to industry innovation through technology adoption to improve fuel efficiency.

Centre of Gravity Optimisation

The aircraft's centre of gravity (CG) significantly influences the safety and efficiency of a flight. Loading the aircraft at the optimised Centre of Gravity ensures proper weight and balance, increasing its aerodynamic efficiency which ultimately saves fuel. Emirates has a rigorous policy of loading aircraft to come as close as possible to the ideal trim line to minimise fuel burn.

APU Usage

One way Emirates reduces fuel consumption on ground is by minimising use of the aircraft auxiliary power unit (APU), instead using the electrical ground power unit (GPU) in order to reduce emissions. APU use has been reduced by more than 30% since this initiative was introduced.

Adjusted potable water uplift

Emirates uses an exacting scientific method of calculating potable water required for a flight to reduce weight for more efficient fuel uplift. Each flight uploads the required amount of potable water without compromising on passenger comfort.

Posted date
First paragraph

Emirates has explained how its pilots reduce fuel and emissions during operations.

Regions
Other topics
Rate
No votes yet
Top story
Off
Article main topic
Redirected
Off
Moved to features
Off
Lead image:
New batch
Off
Fri, 21 Jun 2024 09:14:10 +0000 eNethersole 68565 at http://www.timesaerospace.aero
Locally produced SAF will boost emission reductions in Africa http://www.timesaerospace.aero/news/sustainability/locally-produced-saf-will-boost-emission-reductions-in-africa

African airlines play a vital role in unlocking trade, providing employment, increasing GDP, and demonstrating national and continental pride. However, they face formidable challenges, foremost among them being the cost of aircraft fuel, which exceeds global averages by up to 30%, which can be attributed to the lack of local refining capability, unique market dynamics, taxation and duties, and foreign exchange challenges from weakening local currencies.

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, Africa’s aviation sector has displayed remarkable resilience by returning to pre-pandemic levels. However, if African airlines are to continue to sustain their growth and competitiveness on the global stage, then they will need to fulfil some strategic objectives.

The industry needs the best technologies to maximise operational efficiencies, defend and innovate fuel security, and develop our human resources.

In terms of operational efficiency, Rolls-Royce has a role to play in supporting African airlines.

Our engines power half of the world’s wide-body (twin-aisled) aircraft, connecting passengers, transporting food and goods, and delivering healthcare and humanitarian aid. The most technologically advanced members of the Rolls-Royce engine family are the Trent 7000, which powers the Airbus A330neo, the Trent XWB, which serves the Airbus A350, and, of course, the Trent 1000, which was designed for Boeing’s 787. 

This engine family has continually evolved over the last 30 years. Since the first Trent engine took flight, Rolls-Royce has focused on improving engine performance and reliability, introducing advanced new manufacturing methods, materials, aerodynamics and digital technologies. Just recently, Rolls-Royce committed £1bn to a program that will enhance and advance not only new engines entering the market but also engines already in service. With this new billion-pound investment in new technologies, our existing customers will benefit from improved availability, reliability and fuel efficiency.

Today, a Rolls-Royce Trent XWB aero engine consumes 15% less fuel than the first generation of Trent engines, contributing to savings of about $6.4 million per aircraft per year.

These savings can be even greater in Africa due to the higher cost of jet fuel.

Turning to fuel innovation and security, there are opportunities for Africa in the global transition to cleaner, sustainable aviation fuel (SAF), which will need to be indigenously produced to be truly sustainable. This alternative African fuel would bring immediate benefits to emissions and longer-term fuel security. But the challenge is to produce SAF at scale.

In addition to the well-documented benefits of SAF as a key enabler to reduce aviation carbon emissions by up to 80%.

The subject of SAF will become increasingly important as, from 2025, all airlines flying into the European Union must use a 2% blend of SAF, which will gradually increase to 6% in 2030, 20% by 2035, 34% by 2040, and 70% by 2050. This move has prompted the recently established EU Global Gateway African Euro320bn Investment Package, half of which will be directed towards developing Africa’s SAF capabilities.

Rolls-Royce has actively supported work to support 100% SAF adoption and our role has been to prove there are no technology impediments to its use at engine level. That is why we have recently completed our commitment to ensure all of our in-production civil aero engines are compatible with 100% SAF – a commitment underpinned by a series of tests on the ground and in the air. We were also pleased to support Virgin Atlantic, which operated the first-ever 100% SAF flight across the Atlantic from London to New York late last year, powered by Trent 1000 engines

SAF can be made from waste cooking oils and biofuels produced from agricultural waste or the growing of feedstock plants on marginal lands unsuitable for food crops—a whole new sector of agriculture. The benefits of a regional SAF supply chain include increased energy security, reduced volatility of jet fuel supply and pricing, less forex exposure and economic development opportunities through local investments and job creation.

Choosing the right aerospace technology that continues to advance and evolve while in service simultaneously reduces operating costs, bolsters our growing economy and strengthens our transition to indigenous and better-performing fuel.

Africa has over 24% of the world’s agricultural land and 60% of the world’s uncultivated arable land. Thanks to partnerships forged between the government and private sector in East Africa, we are delighted to see the seeds are already being sown to develop a world-leading biofuel sector.

Posted date
First paragraph

There are opportunities for Africa to cleaner SAF which will need to be indigenously produced to be truly sustainable. By Omar Ali Adib, Rolls-Royce senior vice president, Africa.

Regions
Rate
No votes yet
Top story
On
Article main topic
Redirected
Off
Moved to features
Off
Lead image:
New batch
Off
Thu, 20 Jun 2024 07:52:53 +0000 eNethersole 68557 at http://www.timesaerospace.aero
Front End spearheads historic air taxi trial in Mecca http://www.timesaerospace.aero/news/general-aviation/front-end-spearheads-historic-air-taxi-trial-in-mecca

Front End and Chinese manufacturer EHang worked together with the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA), in collaboration with the Ministry of Transport and Logistics Services, the Ministry of Hajj, and the Ministry of Interior, marked a pivotal step towards a faster, more efficient, and sustainable Hajj.

Abdulaziz Al-Duailej, president of GACA said: “The trial marks a major advancement in integrating advanced air mobility (AAM) solutions into Saudi Arabia’s aviation landscape. We are committed to the highest safety standards and seamless integration into existing air traffic systems. T

‘his trial acts as a proof of concept for multiple use cases and contributes to various AAM roadmap initiatives. We appreciate the instrumental support of Front End and EHang to mark this historic milestone for Saudi Arabia."

The annual Hajj pilgrimage presents unique logistical challenges. This innovative demonstration aims to streamline transportation during this sacred event, by efficiently moving pilgrims faster between key locations, ensuring a smoother and safer Hajj experience.

Majid Alghaslan, chairman and CEO of Saudi technology integrator, Front End, said: “We are at the forefront of this trailblazing trial, paving the way to a new era in smart mobility solutions, potentially revolutionizing Hajj transportation. Aligned with Saudi Vision 2030, our purpose is to foster a ‘Connected Kingdom,’ serving as a gateway for our partners to access growth opportunities in Saudi Arabia and the wider region. This achievement stands as a testament to the power of government-private partnerships in accelerating new technology adoption. Partnering with EHang made this pioneering solution a reality."

Conducted in a low-risk area within protected airspace, the trial was designed to help assist authorities in setting the right regulatory environment for the deployment of eVTOL aircraft which will redefine the Hajj experience by enhancing mobility, reducing congestion, and promoting sustainability.

“These eco-friendly marvels offer a cost-effective solution for urban transportation, tackling congestion while aligning perfectly with the Kingdom’s goals for a sustainable future. This advancement underscores Front End's dedication to national progress and its commitment to shaping a greener, more efficient tomorrow in mobility”, Majid said.

Crowds swarm around the air taxi after its successful trial flight in Mecca

Posted date
Short title
Mecca witnesses eVTOL trial
Short summary

A Saudi technology company and a Chinese eVTOL manufacturer have created history in Mecca with a successful trial of an unmanned air taxi in the Holy city

First paragraph

A successful demonstration of the first unmanned air taxi trial in Mecca is said to pave the way for future implementation of smart mobility solutions in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Other topics
Rate
No votes yet
Top story
On
Article main topic
Redirected
Off
Moved to features
Off
Lead image:
The first Air Taxi test is pictured underway in Saudi Arabia
New batch
Off
Fri, 14 Jun 2024 18:56:59 +0000 aPeaford 68536 at http://www.timesaerospace.aero